Mixer Mania #22 – What’s In A Name?

When Mrs. Sip and I travelled to Egypt in 2008 – you know, before the country descended into total chaos – we found it funny that nearly every Egyptian would mention Canada Dry, the moment they discovered we were Canadian.

I mean, sure, they were likely just associating us with the one Canadian product they had come across in their lives (ironically manufactured by the Dr. Pepper Snapple Group in Texas), but should we take offence that they think we’re dry, packed with ginger and fizzy? At least we work well when healing an upset stomach or other ailment.

With Canada Dry in mind, here are a couple other nicknames for us Canadian folk:

Crazy Canucks

Canucks

I’ve never really liked this one, given that the Vancouver Canucks are my hometown hockey team and I don’t like the term being shared by the rest of the nation. The nickname dates back to being an Americanism, used to describe Dutch or French Canadians. We sure showed them, by creating the character of Johnny Canuck to combat their Uncle Sam.

At least the name has found its way into some good references, such as our national rugby team; the Crazy Canucks of ski racing; used at the Vancouver 2010 Olympics; and even Marvel Comics character Wolverine being dubbed “Ol’ Canucklehead” in some instances.

Canadian Animals.png

Hosers

Made famous by the duo of Bob and Doug McKenzie (played by Rick Moranis and Dave Thomas, respectively), these two hosts of the Great White North show were the original Wayne and Garth of Wayne’s World fame. The skits examined life in the Great White North that is Canada and the pair’s insult term of hosers kind of stuck.

While originally a disdainful term (along with the closely related ‘hosehead’), Canadians have grown fond of it over time, and have even embraced the nickname. Although it is rarely used anymore, for people of older generations, this is a handle we can all still appreciate with our trademark Canadian indifference.

The Coolest, Raddest, Baddest, Dudes and Dudettes on the Planet

Okay, I might have made that one up, but I think we could take this viral and, eventually, make it official!

Mixer Mania #22: The Grave Digger

The Grave Digger.JPG

  • 2 oz Hard Cider
  • 1 oz Whiskey
  • Top with Ginger Ale
  • Garnish with Licorice

I would have thought there’d be a lot more nicknames for Canadians, either created by us or by our American neighbours, but alas, there are only a few.

Sip Advisor Bar Notes (2.5 Sips out of 5):
This drink was okay, but the Hard Cider overshadowed the Ginger Ale. I’m also not thrilled with any recipe that only has an ounce of liquor in it.

 

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August 5 – The Beauty Beneath

Beautiful British Columbia

Today is B.C. Day in my neck of the woods. It is a day to celebrate our fine province with outdoor activities, wonderful food and drink, and great family and friends. With that in mind, here are some of the top attractions in British Columbia. Come by and visit sometime, ya hear!

Whistler

Travelling along the Sea-to-Sky Highway, you will float up through the clouds to the mountain resort of Whistler, which is a top destination throughout the year. In the winter, it is a haven for skiers and snowboarders, who can take to the slopes and enjoy some of the finest white powder this side of Colombia! When summer rolls around, the village becomes a wonderful place for a scenic hike or bike ride, quickly followed by a cold pint amongst some of the finest nature you’ll ever find.

whistler

Grouse Grind

For the outdoor adventurer, the Grouse Grind is something that has to be done to see how you fare against travelers from around the world. The unofficial record stands at 23 minutes and 48 seconds, but most hikers will take about 90 to 120 minutes to complete the trek. You won’t get great views on the Grind, until you reach the top of Grouse Mountain, but it’s the challenge of the trail that keeps people coming back. At least there’s beer, food, and gondolas (for your return trip) at the top as your reward.

Downtown Vancouver

Home to the province’s most famous and desired citizen, yours truly (Mrs. Sip is a close second, however), my suggestion is to ride the hop-on, hop-off bus tour, which visits all the key areas of the core, including Gas Town, Granville Island, the West End, Chinatown, and everything in between. There are also some amazing dining options in the city, including Joe Fortes for seafood; Gotham Steakhouse for, you guessed it, steak; and Tojo’s for sushi.

Downtown_Vancouver_Sunset

Okanagan Valley Wine Country

While enjoying some of the province’s most gorgeous views, you can also visit a countless number of wineries and indulge in tastings that will have you wobbling through one vineyard after another. Over 60 grape varieties are grown in the Okanagan Valley, including a number of German styles, such as Riesling and Gewürztraminer. The region has some of B.C.’s warmest temperatures, to boot.

Stanley Park

This massive park is home to everything from an aquarium to a lagoon, statues to totem poles. It is a serious slice of Canadiana. From Stanley Park, visitors can walk, bike, or rollerblade the Sea Wall that encompasses Downtown Vancouver and enjoy all of the beaches that line the route. At Halloween and Christmas, the Stanley Park train takes thousands of guests through a themed ride that delights children and adults alike.

stanley-park

Sports

While we’ve lost some franchises over time (I never even got to a Grizzlies game in their short time here), the city still has a few offerings, including the beloved Vancouver Canucks (NHL), B.C. Lions (CFL), and Vancouver Whitecaps (MLS). We’re even getting a National Lacrosse League team back in 2014 and for fans of baseball, watching the Vancouver Canadians (an affiliate of the Toronto Blue Jays) at Nat Bailey Stadium makes for a memorable evening out.

Victoria

Home to B.C.’s parliament buildings and the capital of the province, Victoria is a 90-minute ferry ride over from the mainland, but it is well worth it. Victoria is the closest you can come in Canada to feeling like you’re in the U.K. (after all, it was named after Queen Victoria), with its afternoon tea service at the Empress Hotel, cathedrals, castles, and gardens.

Drink #217: The Beauty Beneath

The Beauty Beneath Cocktail

  • 1.5 oz Rum (I used Appleton)
  • 0.5 oz Sweet Vermouth
  • 0.5 oz Campari
  • 0.5 oz Cointreau
  • Dash of Angostura Bitters
  • Garnish with Lemon, Lime and Orange Wedges

There are certainly other spots I’ve neglected and, of course, beauty can be found throughout the province. It’s all in the eye of the beholder. I tend to find beauty in the region’s best liquor stores, so to each their own!

Sip Advisor Bar Notes (2.5 Sips out of 5):
This is a strong martini, but that wasn’t a complete surprise. Campari leaves a bitter, lasting aftertaste that takes a little while to get used to and some may never enjoy it. This cocktail earns a barely passing grade because I liked the sweet touch that came through after the strong Appleton Rum, thanks to the Sweet Vermouth and Cointreau.