Boston Bruins – Black and Gold

Throughout the year, the Sip Advisor will alphabetically travel the National Hockey League (NHL), discovering the best and worst each team has to offer in a variety of subjects. We will also feature a drink based off the franchise. Today, we’re shipping up to Boston to learn about the Bruins and what makes them so big and bad:

Establishment Story: The Bruins were founded in 1924, making them the oldest active U.S.-based team in the NHL. They are an Original Six franchise, created after American businessman Charles Adams convinced the NHL to expand into the U.S. The team’s first GM, Art Ross, chose the team’s name of Bruins, a nickname for brown bears, which matched the team’s original colours of brown and yellow, similar to Adams’ grocery store chain.

Stanley Cups: The Bruins have won six Stanley Cups, most recently sipping from Lord Stanley’s chalice in 2011. Boston has also come up short in the Stanley Cup Finals 14 times, the most runner-up ribbons in NHL history. Their victories came over the New York Rangers (1929 and 1972), Toronto Maple Leafs (1939), Detroit Red Wings (1941), St. Louis Blues (1970), and Vancouver Canucks (2011).

Celebrity Fan: The Bruins have a long list of celebrity supporters. Among them, are the likes of Denis Leary, John Krasinski, Bill Burr, Conor McGregor, and the band Dropkick Murphys.  In a great trolling move, Burr made “Boston” the promo code to some of his comedy shows in Montreal, taking a jab at the long-time Bruins rival. The Dropkick Murphys have a number of songs either used by the Bruins or composed in homage to the team.

Boston Bruins

Super Fan: Liam Fitzgerald, aka Fist-Bump Kid, first became famous for a viral video showing the youngster fist-bumping Bruins players, as they left the ice following their pre-game warmup on November 4, 2014. Fitzgerald, who was born with Down syndrome and diagnosed with leukemia when he was three, was made an honourary member of the team and even has his own hockey card. Now 16, Fist-Bump Kid appeared at the 2023 Winter Classic, fist-bumping Boston players as they were introduced.

Mascot: Blades the Bruin made his debut in 1999. His backstory says Blades was first introduced to hockey by watching long-time Bruins organization member Johnny Bucyk play pond hockey with some kids. Blades hopped into Bucyk’s truck after one of these sessions, arriving later at Boston Garden. There, Bucyk fed Blades pizza, hotdogs, popcorn and soda, and the bear never returned to the wild.

Tradition: Prior to puck drop each night, the Fan Banner, a giant Bruins flag, is passed around the lower bowl as Cochise by the band Audioslave blasts over the speaker system. An honourary Fan Banner captain is often used to lead the pre-game ceremony, which has included other Boston-area sports stars, such as Pedro Martinez and Julian Edelman, as well as inspirational honourees, like the Boston Marathon bombing survivors.

Appearances in Media: The Bruins have been featured in a number of movies and TV shows. First, on Cheers, fictional Bruins goalie Eddie LeBec marries bartender Carla Tortelli. Also, on Rescue Me, firefighter Tommy Gavin (played by Denis Leary) plays on the FDNY hockey team, which faces off against former Bruins Cam Neely and Phil Esposito. Lastly, in Happy Gilmore, the titular character is clad in Bruins home and away jerseys during the film.

Happy Gilmore

Events/Scandals: Mitchell Miller was a renounced draft pick by Arizona Coyotes in 2020, when it was revealed he had repeatedly bullied a developmentally challenged classmate. For some reason, the Bruins thought signing Miller in 2022 was a good idea, kicking another hornet’s nest of troubles for the NHL. Two days after announcing the signing, the Bruins parted ways with Miller, but the damage to the team brand was already done.

Rivalry: The Bruins have had a number of storied rivalries throughout their history. Their arch nemesis would have to be the Montreal Canadiens, whom they have battled in the playoffs 34 times, with Montreal winning 18 straight post-season meetings from 1946 to 1987. Other rivals of the Bruins include the Buffalo Sabres, Toronto Maple Leafs and Philadelphia Flyers (Big Bad Bruins vs. Broad Street Bullies), as well as the defunct Hartford Whalers.

Tragedy: Normand Leveille was Boston’s top pick of the 1981 draft and showed promise in his rookie season, tallying 33 points in 60 games. Sadly, the Bruins never got to see what Leveille would become, as early in his sophomore campaign, he suffered a brain aneurysm, putting him into a three-week coma. Leveille survived, but lost the ability to walk, ending his NHL career at only 19 years old.

Player Nicknames: In 1938, when goalie Frank Brimsek recorded six shutouts in his first seven games with the Bruins, media and fans began calling him Mr. Zero and the ill will showed towards him for being brought in to replace fan favourite Tiny Thompson quickly faded. Later that season, Brimsek’s teammate Mel Hill earned the moniker Sudden Death, thanks to scoring three overtime game-winning goals, helping Boston win the Stanley Cup.

Bruins vs. Canadiens

Line: A number of Bruins lines have gained notoriety, including the Kraut Line (Milt Schmidt, Woody Dumart, and Bobby Bauer), the Nitro Line (Wayne Cashman, Phil Esposito and Ken Hodge) and the Perfection Line (Patrice Bergeron, Brad Marchand and David Pastrnak). The Kraut Line were the first unit to finish a season first, second and third in NHL scoring, while the Nitro Line led the team to two Stanley Cups.

Captain: Zdeno Chara was one of the Bruins best acquisitions ever, when they signed the towering defenseman in 2006. Chara would immediately become captain and lead the 2011 squad to the Stanley Cup. He remained with the team and served in the role of captain for 14 seasons, which included two other unsuccessful trips to the Stanley Cup Finals. Chara signed a one-day contract with Boston in September 2022, in order to retire as a member of the Bruins.

Enforcer: Terry O’Reilly was a great protector of his teammates, who affectionately nicknamed him Taz. Another moniker he was given, this time by the press, was Bloody O’Reilly. O’Reilly holds the Bruins franchise record for penalty minutes with 2,095. He was even referenced as Happy Gilmore’s favourite hockey play. O’Reilly’s #24 jersey was retired by the team in 2002.

Family Values: A few father and son duos enjoyed separate stints with the Bruins, including franchise legend Ray Bourque and son Chris; Ted Donato and son Ryan (each drafted by the Bruins 27 years apart); Ken Hodge and son Ken Jr. (first father and son to score a hat trick for the same team); and Ron Grahame and son John (first father and son to play goalie for the same team).

Chara

Returning Players: Goalie Gerry Cheevers was claimed by the Bruins in 1965 Intra-League Draft and would go on to backstop the team to their 1970 and 1972 Stanley Cups. He also went on a NHL record 32-game undefeated streak in 1972, before leaving to play in the World Hockey Association. Following a contract dispute in 1975, Cheevers returned to Boston, finishing his career with five more seasons. Cheevers may be best remembered for his mask, which he marked with stitches in places it had been hit.

Short Stint: A pair of Hall of Fame defensemen finished their careers with the Bruins. First, Paul Coffey was signed to a two-year, $4 million contract in the 2000 off-season, but after 18 games and only providing four assists, he was waived and went unclaimed by another team. Next, Brian Leetch joined Boston for the 2005-06 season, recording his 1,000 career point, over 61 contests with the team.

Undrafted: Defenseman Torey Krug was signed out of the NCAA in 2012, following a season where he led the league in scoring and was named a Hobey Baker Award (Player of the Year) finalist. Krug remained with the Bruins until 2020. Another notable college signing for Boston was Mike Milbury, who would spend his entire 12-season NHL career with the Bruins and also coach the team from 1989 to 1991.

Trade: Among the Bruins greatest trades, was acquiring star Phil Esposito from the Chicago Blackhawks in 1967. Esposito came to Boston along with Ken Hodge and Fred Stanfield, developing into one of the best players of his generation. Esposito would win two Stanley Cups as a member of the Bruins, before being dealt in another blockbuster to the New York Rangers in 1975.

Phil Esposito

Signing: The rules of the NHL were much different in 1962, when the Bruins signed future superstar Bobby Orr, at the time only 14 years old. The terms of the deal saw the Bruins give Orr and his family a $10,000 signing bonus, a new car and add stucco to their home. Orr would finally join the Bruins on the ice as an 18-year-old, staying with the team for 10 seasons, winning eight straight (1968-75) Norris Trophies, as the NHL’s top defenseman.

Draft Pick: The Bruins greatest selection ever was taking Ray Bourque 8th overall in 1979. Perhaps the teams greatest draft class was their 2006 haul, when they collected Phil Kessel (5th overall), Milan Lucic (50th overall) and Brad Marchand (71st overall) in subsequent rounds. Boston also did very well landing Patrice Bergeron at 45th overall in 2003. Bergeron has gone on to win five Selke Trophies, as the league’s best defensive forward.

Holdouts: Phil Kessel’s 2009 holdout wasn’t allowed to extend too long, as he was dealt to the Toronto Maple Leafs after both sides failed to reach any agreement on a new contract over the off-season. The haul for dealing Kessel was very good, made even better when the Maple Leafs performed poorly the next two seasons, resulting in Boston drafting Tyler Seguin (2nd overall in 2010), Jared Knight (32nd overall in 2010) and Dougie Hamilton (9th overall in 2011).

Buyouts: Boston’s most costly buyout was Dennis Seidenberg, who they were forced to pay $4,666,667, while Seidenberg plied his trade with the New York Islanders for a couple campaigns. Seidenberg was a prominent member of the 2011 Stanley Cup-winning team and had been with the Bruins for seven seasons before being released in 2016. He retired in 2019.

Ray Bourque

Unique Game: The Bruins profile and success has resulted in the team playing many outdoor games, including the 2010, 2016, 2019 and 2023 Winter Classics versus the Philadelphia Flyers, Montreal Canadiens, Chicago Blackhawks and Pittsburgh Penguins, respectively. They also battled the Flyers  for one of the 2021 Outdoors at Lake Tahoe games. In 1956, Boston played exhibition games against local teams in New Brunswick and Newfoundland.

Goal: Bobby Orr scored many spectacular goals over his career, but none compare to his Stanley Cup-clinching tally in 1970. It’s perhaps best remembered for Orr soaring through the air after scoring the overtime marker, arms raised in triumph, while being tripped by St. Louis Blues defenseman Noel Picard. I mean, the play is actually known as The Goal in hockey lore. What else could go here?

Fight/Brawl: It was a wild night in 1979, when members of the Bruins ended up in the stands of Madison Square Garden, fighting with fans of the New York Rangers. The chaos started at the end of the game, when Stan Jonathan was assaulted by a fan. Jonathan’s Boston teammates came to his aid, with the highlight of the melee being Mike Milbury beating a fan with their own shoe. The NHL installed higher glass in arenas, as a result of the incident.

Injury: Cam Neely’s knee-on-knee collision with Pittsburgh Penguins defenseman Ulf Samuelsson in the 1991 playoffs, was the first of many knee issues, resulting in Neely only playing 22 games over the next couple seasons and being forced into retirement at the age of 31. Neely’s attempts to return to the game were recognized with him being awarded the Bill Masterton Memorial Trophy for perseverance and dedication in 1994.

The Goal

Penalty: Billy Coutu, nicknamed Wild Beaver, was banned from the NHL for life in 1927, after assaulting referee Jerry Laflamme. The incident occurred after the Bruins lost the Stanley Cup Finals to the Ottawa Senators. Coutu’s ban would be lifted in 1929, allowing him to play minor league hockey. He would also be reinstated into the NHL for the 1932-33 season, but never played in the league again.

Wildest Story: In 1948, the NHL banned Bruins forward Don Gallinger and former teammate Billy Taylor (traded to the New York Rangers that season, when management questioned his poor play) for life, after it was discovered the pair had gambled on their own teams. Gallinger and Taylor were reinstated in 1970, marking the longest ever suspensions in league history.

Blooper: The most famous Too Many Men on the Ice penalty in NHL history occurred in Game 7 of the 1979 Stanley Cup Semi-Finals. With Boston up 4-3 over the Montreal Canadiens and a berth in the Finals looming, the Bruins were penalized late in the game. Montreal scored on the power play and won the game in overtime. Boston coach Don Cherry (who played his only NHL game with the Bruins) was later fired for the gaffe.

Miscellaneous: When Willie O’Ree suited up for the Bruins on January 18, 1958, he broke hockey’s black colour barrier, becoming the “Jackie Robinson of ice hockey”. All this, despite suffering an eye injury years earlier, that should have ended his career had he not kept it hidden. O’Ree was named the NHL’s Diversity Ambassador in 1998 and inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in 2018. His #22 jersey was retired by the Bruins in 2022.

Boston Bruins: Black and Gold

Black and Gold

  • 1.5 oz Jack Daniel’s Honey Whiskey
  • 0.5 oz Triple Sec
  • 0.5 oz Cinnamon Schnapps
  • Top with Iced Tea
  • Garnish with Lemon Slices

There are numerous recipes with this name. I went with the one that interested me the most and was used by a Boston pizzeria in support of the Bruins. I couldn’t find exact measurements for the drink, so built it as I wanted to. Some ingredients could be altered for a different mix.

Arizona Coyotes – Coyote on the Rocks

Throughout the year, the Sip Advisor will alphabetically travel the National Hockey League (NHL), discovering the best and worst each team has to offer in a variety of subjects. We will also feature a drink based off the franchise. Today, we venture to the hotbed of hockey that is Arizona. While checking out the Coyotes operation, we must be mindful of the franchise’s past in Winnipeg as the first incarnation of the Jets:

Establishment Story: On July 1, 1996, the Winnipeg Jets became the Phoenix Coyotes, moving their operations from the frozen tundra to the desert. The original plan was to relocate to Minneaplos-St. Paul, but the new owners couldn’t arrange an arena lease, so Phoenix became the destination. A fan vote was conducted to name the team, with Coyotes being the winner over Scorpions.

Stanley Cups: The Jets/Coyotes franchise has never appeared in a Stanley Cup Final (the oldest team to have not made the Finals), let alone won the championship. The deepest the team has ever gone in the playoffs was the Western Conference Finals in 2012. It should be noted, the Jets were extremely successful during their stint in the World Hockey Association (WHA), winning the Avco Cup three times during the league’s seven seasons of existence.

Celebrity Fan: The ‘Godfather of Shock Rock’ Alice Cooper has long been a fan of the Coyotes, being an Arizona native since he was a teenager. The team has even given away Alice Cooper bobbleheads as a fan promotion in 2012. Cooper can often be spotted at games or rocking the classic Kachina-style jersey. Goalie Mike Smith even had Cooper painted on the back of his helmet in 2015.

Alice Cooper

Super Fan: Any supporter of the Coyotes has to be considered a super fan, no? Seriously, though, Leighton Accardo was a 9-year-old Coyotes supporter who sadly lost her 18-month battle with cancer in late 2020. Prior to passing, Accardo played youth hockey in the Arizona Kachinas program and was signed to a one-day contract by the Coyotes. On that night, rather than drop the puck for the ceremonial face-off, the youngster actually took the draw.

Mascot: Howler the Coyote (full name Canis Howlus Maximus) debuted in 2005. He wears jersey number 96, representing the year the team arrived in Arizona. Also, rather than have a captain’s ‘C’ on his jersey, Howler has the letter ‘M’ for mascot. Howler is best known for being a great drummer, joining area bands during Coyotes Foundation charity events.

Tradition: The White Out began as a Jets ritual, but carried over to Phoenix when the franchise relocated. It began in 1987 to counter the Calgary Flames ‘C of Red’, as the Jets were facing the Flames in the playoffs that season. Winnipeg swept the series and fans hoped the White Out would continue to bring good luck. In Arizona, lyrics to the Wang Chung song “Everybody Have Fun Tonight” have been altered to “Everybody wear white tonight” in marketing campaigns.

Appearances in Media: There are a couple documentaries feature footage of the original Jets. This includes Sel8nne, about the career of Teemu Selanne, and Death by Popcorn: The Tragedy of the Winnipeg Jets, covering the rise and fall of that franchise. The title comes from an incident in the 1990 playoffs, when the Jets were on the verge of finally defeating the Edmonton Oilers, until a fan threw popcorn on the ice, causing a long delay and changing the momentum of the game and series in the Oilers favour.

Howler

Events/Scandals: When the Coyotes selected Mitchell Miller in the fourth round of the 2020 NHL Entry Draft, they didn’t realize the firestorm they were about to set off. According to a report weeks later in The Arizona Republic, Miller had been found guilty in 2016 of repeatedly bullying a developmentally disabled African American classmate. The Coyotes renounced the draft pick as a result.

Rivalry: Aside from brief flirtations with rivalries, the Coyotes greatest battle seems to be against financial stability. For a time, the Coyotes most hated opponents were the Los Angeles Kings, based on their heated 2012 Western Conference Final series. When the franchise was based in Winnipeg, perennial Smythe Division leaders the Edmonton Oilers and Calgary Flames provided the team with many great clashes.

Tragedy: While playing with the Tucson Roadrunners (the Coyotes minor league affiliate), captain Craig Cunningham suffered a cardiac arrest prior to puck drop on November 19, 2016. It took 83 minutes of CPR to keep Cunningham alive. Due to the incident, Cunningham’s lower left leg had to be amputated because of an infection that followed circulation issues. No longer able to play, Cunningham was offered a pro scout position with the Coyotes.

Player Nicknames: The Coyotes greatest legacy on the game of hockey may be some of the nicknames the team has been responsible for over the Arizona/Winnipeg existence. Some include Finnish Flash (Teemu Selanne), Bulin Wall (goalie Nikolai Khabibulin) and BizNasty (Paul Bissonnette). A few others to be considered include Ducky (Dale Hawerchuk), Rhino (Zac Rinaldo), Goose (Alex Goligoski) and Stinky (Christian Fischer).

Arizona Coyotes

Line: When superstar Bobby Hull was joined by European imports Anders Hedberg and Ulf Nilsson to form the Hot Line, the unit dominated the WHA. They played together for four seasons, winning two Avco Cups, before both Hedberg and Nilsson joined the NHL’s New York Rangers. Perhaps the greatest compliment of the trio came from Edmonton Oilers GM Glen Sather, who said he used the Hot Line as a template for building his 1980s dynasty teams.

Captain: Shane Doan spent his entire career as a member of the Coyotes. For 13 of those 21 seasons, he served as the team’s captain. At the time Doan retired in 2017, he was the longest-serving captain in the NHL, providing the Coyotes franchise with some semblance of stability amongst all their other issues. Doan’s jersey was retired by the team in 2019. He recorded 402 goals and 972 points over 1,540 games with the club, all franchise records.

Enforcer: Kris King’s tenure with the franchise spanned both the Winnipeg and Phoenix incarnations of the team. Originally brought in to provide protection for the likes of Teemu Selanne and Keith Tkachuk, the ‘King of Pain’ recorded 762 penalty minutes and 71 fighting majors over his five seasons with the club. King was awarded the King Clancy Memorial Trophy in 1996, given to an NHL player who has made significant contributions to their community.

Family Values: From 1993 to 1996, brothers Darryl and Darrin Shannon played together for the Jets. Coyote lifer Shane Doan had the pleasure of being part of the team’s draft table when they selected his son, Josh Doan, 37th overall in 2021. Josh was born and raised in Arizona, as his father played two decades with the franchise. Brothers Philip and Henrik Samuelsson were members of the organization at the same time, while dad Ulf was a former assistant coach.

Shane Doan

Returning Players: Radim Vrbata had three tenures with the Coyotes. He first played for the club for the 2007-08 season. He split the next campaign between the Tampa Bay Lightning and two teams in the Czech Extraliga, before returning to the Coyotes for five seasons. After a two-year stint with the Vancouver Canucks, Vrbata once again called Arizona home for a year. He finished his career with the Florida Panthers, retiring in 2018.

Short Stint: Coming out of the 2004-05 NHL lockout, legendary scorer Brett Hull joined the Coyotes. His dad’s #9 jersey (retired when the team was in Winnipeg) was unretired, allowing him to wear it. However, just five games into the season, Hull believed he could no longer play at the level he expected of himself and abruptly retired. He had recorded only one assist in those contests.

Undrafted: Winger Doug Smail signed with the Jets in 1980, following three years at the University of North Dakota. He remained with the team for 11 seasons and holds a couple interesting records, including the franchise mark for shorthanded goals (25), while sharing the NHL record with three others for fastest goal to start a game (five seconds). He was also the first player to ever join the U.K.’s Elite Ice Hockey League directly from the NHL.

Trade: It was tough to lose the face of their franchise, but at the 1990 NHL Draft, the Jets granted Dale Hawerchuk’s trade request, sending him to the Buffalo Sabres with a first-round draft choice. In return, the Jets received all-star defenseman Phil Housley, Scott Arniel, Jeff Parker and a first-round pick, used to select future star Keith Tkachuk. Another good move was acquiring Jeremy Roenick from the Chicago Blackhawks in 1996 for a package of assets. Roenick was a splashy move for the team’s Phoenix debut.

Brett Hull

Signing: When Mike Smith joined the Coyotes in 2011 on a very reasonable two-year, $4 million deal, he instantly legitimized the team’s goaltending. With Smith in net, the franchise won its first playoff series since 1987 and advanced to the Western Conference Finals for the first time ever. Smith’s success also came on offense, as he scored a rare goalie goal on October 19, 2013.

Draft Pick: Despite a long history of poor performances, the Coyotes have never held a draft pick better than third overall. The Jets selected first overall once, in 1981, taking future Hall of Fame member Dale Hawerchuk. Perhaps the franchise’s greatest pick of all-time was Teemu Selanne (10th overall in 1988), while their diamond in the rough find would be Nikolai Khabibulin (204th overall in 1992).

Holdouts: Nikolai Khabibulin’s contract impasse with the Coyotes, following the 1998-99 season, resulted in the goalie missing almost two full years of NHL action. Khabibulin would finally be traded to the Tampa Bay Lightning on March 5, 2001, suiting up for the team twice before the end of the year. The move worked out well for Khabibulin, as the Lightning won the 2004 Stanley Cup, with him in the crease.

Buyouts: Mike Ribeiro’s time with the Coyotes was brief. Coming off a season where he scored a point per game with the Washington Capitals, Ribeiro signed a four-year, $22 million contract with the Coyotes in 2013. Following a single season, Ribeiro was bought out due to behavioural issues, related to alcohol use. Arizona paid Ribeiro $11,666,667 to not play for them, while the forward signed on with the Nashville Predators.

Mike Smith

Unique Game: For a 2006 pre-season game, the Coyotes returned to where it all began, playing the Edmonton Oilers in Winnipeg, 10 years after the Jets relocation to Phoenix. The Coyotes also opened the 2010 season with a pair of contests against the Boston Bruins in Prague, Czechia. Finally, there has been talk of the Coyotes playing an outdoor game in Mexico, which would be the first time NHL action has ever taken place in the country.

Goal: On March 2, 1993, Teemu Selanne surpassed Mike Bossy’s rookie scoring record of 53, with a goal against the Quebec Nordiques. The tally was made even more memorable thanks to Selanne’s celebration of throwing his glove into the air and using his stick as a gun to shoot it down. Selanne would finish the season with an incredible 76 goals and 132 points (also a NHL record), en route to being named the NHL’s top rookie, winning the Calder Memorial Trophy.

Fight/Brawl: An October 11, 1985 bench clearing brawl between the Jets and Calgary Flames is memorable for a couple reasons. The second period skirmish resulted in six game ejections, including Jets assistant coach Rick Bowness, who took a swipe at Flames enforcer Tim Hunter, the player thought to ignite the melee. Also ejected was Flames backup goalie Mark D’Amour, who was dressing in his first NHL game.

Injury: Coyotes star Clayton Keller had his 2021-22 season ended early when he crashed into the boards, fracturing his leg. A stretcher was needed to remove Keller from the ice, followed by surgery. Another notable injury was Jeremy Roenick having his jaw broken in 1999 by Derian Hatcher of the Dallas Stars. The blatant elbow was retribution for Roenick hitting Dallas superstar Mike Modano in the teams previous encounter. Hatcher was suspended seven games for the incident.

Teemu Selanne

Penalty: Jets tough guy Jimmy Mann was coming off a three-game suspension a month earlier for pushing a linesman, when on January 13, 1982, he left the bench and sucker punched Paul Gardner of the Pittsburgh Penguins, breaking his jaw. The attack was in retaliation for Gardner injuring a teammate just prior. For this offense, Mann was suspended for 10 games, along with being charged with assault causing bodily harm in Manitoba court. Mann pled guilty, receiving a maximum $500 fine.

Wildest Story: On December 8, 2021, it was announced the Coyotes owed $1.3 million in back taxes and they would be locked out of the Gila River Arena if the money was not paid by December 20, 2021. This was the last straw in their lease agreement with the City of Glendale and the Coyotes were forced to find a new home for the 2022-23 season, eventually coming to terms with Arizona State University to play out of their 5,000 seat Mullett Arena.

Blooper: Mike Smith was one of the best goalies in franchise history, but he is also remembered for one of the most bizarre own goals fans have ever seen. During a December 2013 game against the Buffalo Sabres, the puck launched into the air, coming down and getting stuck in the back of Smith’s gear. Smith, losing sight of the puck, backed into his own net. The tally is known today as the ‘Butt Goal’ and worst of all, it occurred in overtime, giving the Sabres the win.

Miscellaneous: During the 2003-04 season, netminder Brian Boucher recorded five consecutive shutouts, with a shutout streak of 332:01, setting modern day NHL records for both stats. The previous records belonged to Gary Durnan, who earned four consecutive shutouts and a streak of 309:21 playing for the Montreal Canadiens in 1949. The all-time records date back to the 1927-28 season, when Ottawa Senators goalie Alec Connell had six consecutive shutouts and a streak of 460:49.

Arizona Coyotes: Coyote on the Rocks

Coyote on the Rocks

  • 1.5 oz Tequila
  • Top with Grapefruit Juice
  • Splash of Grenadine
  • Garnish with a Maraschino Cherry

This beverage is similar to a Paloma, which is among the Sip Advisor’s favourite cocktails. Some differences include the addition of grenadine and no salt for the drink’s rim. I like the double entendre this recipe conjures, as you can imagine a coyote resting on rocks or it could just be the ice filling your glass.