Flavour Revolution – Macadamia Nut

Edible Honours

Macadamia nuts were named as such, by Ferdinand von Mueller, who discovered and named many Australian plants. The name was derived from von Mueller’s friend, Dr. John Macadam. Macadam was a chemist, teacher and politician, proving it certainly helps to have friends in high places. This all got the Sip Advisor thinking about what other foods were named after people… so let’s get right to it:

Caesar Salad

The Sip Advisor is a massive fan of Caesar Salad. There’s just something about the blend of greens, croutons, parmesan cheese, and dressing that is so perfect. Hell, throw some bacon or chicken on that appetizer and you’re in heaven. Who do we have to thank for all this? Caesar Cardini, a chef, restauranteur, and hotel owner, who turned the salad and particularly the dressing into viable business and family fortune. Apprently, there’s an “original” version of the salad served at Hotel Caesar’s in Tijuana, Mexico, where Cardini ran businesses, allowing him to avoid prohibition laws.

Caesar Salad Stab

Nachos

Originally consisting of fried tortilla chips, melted cheese, and jalapenos, this Mexican culinary staple was created by Ignacio ‘Nacho’ Anaya for his El Moderno restaurant in Piedras Negras, Mexico. Legend has it, Anaya quickly whipped up the dish when visitors arrived at his eatery when it was already closed. Nachos have grown to be so popular that they even have their own international day of celebration, each October 21st. Even when the Sip Advisor refused all cheese as a youngster, he made the occasional exception for nachos.

Reuben Sandwich

There are two different stories about the creation of this sandwich, consisting of corned beef, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese, on rye bread, with either Russian or Thousand Island dressing. The first, says that Ruben Kulakofsky invented the meal, while playing poker at the Blackstone Hotel in Omaha, Nebraska. The sandwich went onto fame when a former employee at the inn submitted it to a national recipe contest. Another tale, gives credit to Arnold Reuben, owner of Reuben’s Delicatessen in New York. Published items, referencing the sandwich and the deli, appeared as early as 1926, although Kulakofsky’s poker game lasted between 1920 and 1935, approximately.

Graham Crackers

Without these beauties, we might never know the joy of smores! The crackers were invented by Sylvester Graham, a Presbyterian minister, who advocated for vegetarianism and the Temperance Movement. Graham’s followers were dubbed Grahamites and they were taught to abstain from alcohol, bathe regularly, brush their teeth daily, and abstain from masturbation (which he thought led to blindness) and sex. There’s definitely a few items in that list I’m not down with… I mean, who needs toothpaste every day! I’ve known Graham crackers to often lead to camping craziness, so I think the good minister missed his mark.

Kit Kat Lasagna

Cobb Salad

You know those times when you’re desperate for a late night snack and you just start throwing things together to see what works? Well, Robert H. Cobb was having one of those nights in the mid 1930’s, and invented the Cobb Salad. Cobb was the owner of the famous Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood, California. Once the recipe passed Cobb’s taste test, it was added to the café’s menu and it grew in popularity from there. For those unfamiliar with the salad, it consists of greens, tomato, bacon, chicken, hard-boiled egg, avocado, onion, cheese, and black olives, all doused in a red-wine vinaigrette.

Salisbury Steak

The Salisbury steak was invented by J.H. Salisbury, with the term “Salisbury” being used for meals of ground beef, shaped like a steak, with gravy on top, since 1897. This guy sounds pretty awesome, shunning vegetables and starch items, which he believed were poisonous… and he was even a doctor. Salisbury suggested that folks eat the meal three times a day, as part of a low-carb diet. Despite the good doctor’s original theory, Salisbury steaks today are often paired with mashed potatoes or noodles. The name, for what is basically a hamburger, grew in popularity during World War I, when countries around the world were encouraged to rename food items with German monikers.

Flavour Revolution: Mauna Kea Martini

Mauna Kea Martini

  • 1.5 oz Gold Rum
  • 0.5 oz Macadamia Nut Liqueur
  • 0.25 oz Chocolate Liqueur
  • Splash of Milk
  • Garnish with a Chocolate Ball

Anyone who has travelled to Hawaii knows of the popularity of macadamia nuts. They’re everywhere on the collection of islands and you can’t return home without picking up a few cans of the snack. Mrs. Sip is also a huge fan of Nutty McWhite’s at Purdy’s Chocolates, here in our home province of B.C. You gotta try one, if you ever have the chance!

Sip Advisor Bar Notes (4.5 Sips out of 5):
While one doesn’t normally turn to rum when crafting martinis, in this recipe, it worked incredibly well. The martini is strong, but not overwhelming… exactly what you’d expect from a beverage of this ilk. Best of all, none of the ingredients overshadows its fellow compatriots, with flavours of Macadamia Nuts, Chocolate and Rum all coming in at varying points of each sip!

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